It’s Not Grim Up North

Data from peer-to-peer lender Kuflink shows that rental yields in the North of England and Scotland have been comfortably beating rental yields in London at 4.3% and 3.2% respectively. While this is, of course, interesting news for (potential) buy-to-let investors, it’s still useful market intelligence for those who prefer to avoid the politics of buy-to-let and invest in the property market through other channels, for example property development.

Takeaway point 1 – There’s a difference between price and value

London and the South East is an expensive place and hence landlords are likely to be able to charge higher rents than they would for equivalent properties in other parts of the country. The flip side of this, however, is that buying the rental property is likely to have cost them more than an equivalent property in another part of the country. There are still plenty of reasons why the Thames Valley area could be a good place to invest in property in some way, but it’s worth remembering that there is strong demand for property in other parts of the UK as well and hence opportunities for investors.

Takeaway point 2 – It’s always worth looking out for up-and-coming areas

According to Kuflink, Manchester and Salford provided rental yields of 6.7% and 6.6% respectively whereas Cambridge was a mere 2.7%. The data did not analyse why this was so, but one very feasible explanation is that Manchester and its neighbour Salford have both been in a process of regeneration over recent years, with the BBC making news itself by moving some of its production to Salford back in 2012. The availability of work attracts people to an area, particularly young adults, for whom renting is likely to be the most appropriate option, even if they have the funds to buy. The combination of relatively low house prices (compared to London) and increased demand for rental properties makes for good rental yield. It also offers good opportunities for other forms of property investment since many of the people who arrive as renters will ultimately settle down and buy property in the area. Cambridge, by contrast, is a mature market. As a University town, it has a pretty much guaranteed market for rental properties and as a research centre it also has a demand for property to buy, but there is nothing new about any of this and so the opportunity to invest at the start of an upward trend is really long gone. The North of England and Scotland have both been benefitting from improved infrastructure (particularly transport links and broadband internet) and as they are outside the “city” zone, they have less reason to be concerned about the prospect of some financial service roles being moved out of the UK due to Brexit.

Takeaway point 3 – Quality matters

The fact that in the UK there is always a strong demand for housing is hardly a secret and a quick scan of a newspaper website will probably reveal plenty of articles about landlords and home builders taking advantage of desperate renters or buyers. While there is certainly an element of truth in this, the simple fact is that the fundamentals of business also apply to the property market, even though it generally moves at a slower pace. Companies (or individuals) who supply shoddy goods and/or poor customer service may make a quick short-term profit, but over the long term they tend to get found out and weeded out. Because of this, anyone looking to make meaningful, long-term returns from property, whether that’s as a landlord or as an investor in property development, is well advised to be very selective about their purchases and only put money into high-quality builds.

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Top 5 Property Development Mistakes

If daytime TV is to be believed, anyone can make a career in property development and can somehow managed to turn in a respectable profit on a property in spite of costs and building time both being substantially higher than expected. In the real world, most people realise that if it was that easy, everyone would be doing it. If, however, you do want to develop a property yourself, either as a career or as a one-off project, here are the top mistakes to avoid.

Buying unsuitable property or land

If you fall in love with a place to live and you want to develop it yourself from start to finish to be your dream home, then what you buy can be guided entirely by your own preferences. If, however, you want to make a profit out of the development then you need to ensure that any property or land you buy has decent commercial prospects. Often this means making yourself thoroughly familiar with the local area as a whole and understanding what the future is likely to bring.

Over-leveraging

In principle a lender should pick up on whether or not you are over-stretching your finances, but at the end of the day, it is your responsibility to manage your money. Starting out on a stretched budget before you’ve even started your project is, quite bluntly, a way to set yourself up for heartache and wallet ache.

Underestimating the money and/or time required

Learning to price developments accurately is vital for anyone who wants to make a career as a property developer and is still hugely important to anyone taking on a property development project for their own interest. Property development companies check their figures very carefully before committing to any commercial project, they also have extensive experience to guide their judgement. Amateurs are probably best advised to check their figures as best as they can and allow themselves a substantial financial cash cushion in case of error. Similar comments apply to estimating the amount of time required for a project. Getting this wrong can seriously damage your budget.

Failing to understand the importance of a professional and independent architect.

As a rule of thumb, if a project is substantial enough to need planning permission, it probably needs an architect’s involvement and even if it isn’t an architect could still be very useful. Employing an architect directly means that their only responsibility is to you, their client. Using a builder’s architectural services can set up a conflict of interest since the decisions which make the highest level of profit for the builder may actually be the wrong ones for your property and unless you really know your way around property development well enough to pick up on this, you may wind up spending a lot of money for little to no return.

Getting the wrong builder

Sadly, cowboy builders are a fact of life rather than just a TV fable. It’s vital to avoid them (an architect can also come in useful here as they often know their way around local construction companies).

Trying to pack too much into too little

This is another mistake, which may be down to the influence of daytime television. In a densely-populated country such as the UK, space is at a premium and therefore, on a like for like basis, the more people who can share a space, the more economical that space becomes. Hence people who already own homes they like may well try to squeeze a little more usability out of the space they have so they can avoid having to move (or at least delay the move). The key point to remember, however, is that spaces need to be liveable. Multifunction furniture and modern technology may have made it possible to live, comfortably, in smaller spaces, but there are still limits and this needs to be recognised.

Certainly it’s worth talking to a professional development company, it could save you a lot of the heartache but still give you similar or even better returns.

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